Which is correct, ‘I’ve filled out the form’ or ‘I …

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    Ariana,

    The first one “filled out the form” is correct.

    The verb PHRASE is “to fill out.” The second option splits the verb. A no-no.

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    Both are found in current usage.

    From a strict grammatical standpoint, you shouldn’t end a sentence with a preposition.

    So grammatically, the first is better. But you will find both in everyday use, making both structures acceptable.

    In an exam or coursework, I would still encourage the following of grammar rules.

    😊

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    Either are correct, but remove the “I’ve” and just use “I”.

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    Where I’m from we say ‘I’ve filled the form IN’ or I’ve filled IN the form’ – I believe filling a form out is an Americanism.

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    • A. Fill something out is a phrasal verb.
    • I’ve filled out the form. ( correct ) – form ( a noun ) after out
    • I’ve filled it out. (correct) – it ( a pronoun ) before out

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    The grammar police will not send you to jail for “I’ve filled the form out” but “I’ve filled out the form” is a better sentence.

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    Which is correct, “I’ve filled out the form” or “I’ve filled the form out”?

    They are both correct.

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    Which is correct, “I’ve filled out the form” or “I’ve filled the form out”?

    Both are perfectly correct. You can choose whichever you like.

    The verb, ‘to fill out’ is a unit. The word, ‘out’, which looks like a preposition isn’t a preposition in this verb.

    This verb (‘to fill out’) is called a phrasal verb [distinguish from a prepositional verb!] The particle, ‘out’ changes the meaning of ‘fill’ so ‘to fill out’ means, ‘to complete.’

    The object of this verb can directly follow the base verb (fill) or come after the particle (out.)

    • Please fill out the form. (The object follows the whole verb.)
    • Please fill the form out. (The object directly follows the base verb, fill, and comes at the end of the sentence.)

    The verb, ‘to give up’ is a phrasal verb too (in the following example.) It means ‘to stop’, or ‘to quit.’

    • I will give up playing football. (The object, playing football, follows the whole phrasal verb.)
    • I will give (playing) football up. (The object directly follows the base verb.)

    So both sentences in your example are perfectly correct.

    Both are acceptable. If the object is ‘it,’ it must go before ‘out’: “I’ve filled it out.” There’s perhaps a greater tendency to put a noun after the particle (preposition or adverb) with this kind of verb, i.e. “I’ve filled out the form,” but there’s no rule. However, with a long predicate, we put ‘out’ immediately after ‘filled,’ e.g. “I’ve filled out the form that you gave me yesterday.”

    Note that this applies to ‘separable’ verbs and particles, where the particles can be moved. Some verbs and their particles are ‘inseparable,’ e.g. we can only say, “You can count on me” and “I got in the car.”

    Either is acceptable but traditionally (and perhaps logically) speaking we fill in forms, just as we colour something in, not out.

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    There is a very fine distinction between “fill in” and “fill out” in English. They are sometimes used interchangeably, but here are some examples where they are used differently.

    You always “fill in” the blanks. (meaning put a response on the blank line.)

    You “fill out” a form. (meaning you fill in each blank line on an entire form.)

    You “fill in” your name. (meaning you put your name on the line.)

    You “fill in” the details. (meaning that, either in writing or verbally, you give the complete details so a story makes sense.)

    You “fill out” your wardrobe. (meaning you buy more clothes so that you have all types of clothing that you might need — such a casual, dressy, and everyday clothes.))

    A young girl “fills out” as she grows up. (meaning her bust develops and grows larger as she finishes puberty.)

    I hope that helps.

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